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IVOprop current limiter project

 
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2018 11:11 pm    Post subject: IVOprop current limiter project Reply with quote

I've successfully completed this IVOprop current limiter project that designed by the collaborative effort of this group. After a bit of tweaking of the code by Paul Fisher and switching the position of the 2 zener diodes, it works perfectly.
For those that are unaware of what this project is;
The IVOprop as supplied uses a 10 amp circuit breaker to indicate end-of-travel. Now the IVO is a love-it or hate-it prop but even those that are in the love-it category will admit that waiting for a breaker to trip is not a very elegant way to know when the prop has reached it's end of travel. So over several years a project evolved on this list originally being completely hardware based and then evolving into this current micro controller based project. The original design was built by at least 2 individuals but it appeared that despite the work put in by members of this list, the micro controller based version had not been built. I had read with interest while the discussions were ongoing, but due to other commitments at the time, my project was on hold so I did not contribute. As I've recently returned to flight I decided I wanted to pursue this idea so I searched the archives and downloaded the material that Bob had hosted on his site in my efforts to revive this project.
    But what does it do, you might be asking??? Well it limits the current to 9.5 amps to the propeller pitch drive motor. When the prop blades reach their end of travel and come up against the soft stops, the current begins to sharply rise and when the controller senses that it reaches between 9.1 and 9.5 amps it will cut power to the drive and illuminate an LED on the panel to indicate that it has reached end of travel. The prop can be reversed immediately if required without having to reset the circuit breaker. The function is the same in both directions of travel. It is a far better solution.
  As always Electric Bob, deserves the lions share of credit for this, Paul Fisher wrote the code, but there were many others that contributed to it as well. Forgive but it's late as I type and I don't have time to search through the archives again to find all of the names of those that contributed to this effort. But I thank you, as I stood on your shoulders to finish this.

I've put the marked-up schematic and BOM as well as the hex code and all other pertinent files in a Google Drive folder at 
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1DeszjALTF6-L8dvuiy9jV7BY5q4t3G68?usp=sharing

In this file there is everything needed to duplicate this project including the gerber files for having the PCB boards manufactured at far less cost than by ExpressPCB. These files were provided by ExpressPCB who made the boards for me, so they should be accurate.
   However rather than go through all that trouble, you can buy one of the spare kits that I've put together at cost. I had 6 boards, so I ordered the components for all of them. I built two of them so that I could do the testing on at least 2 to ensure it was going to work. Obviously, I've kept one for myself and I've already sold one of the kits.
So I still have 3 kits for sale and one complete project. All of the PIC chips in each of the projects is programmed and as been tested in one of the complete projects on my plane, so there is no need to worry about learning to program these micro-controllers.
It ended up costing me about $400 all in for this project due to the cost of getting the prototype boards made and shipped to Canada along with my error in ordering an overpriced and obsolete PIC programmer, before ordering the correct one at a more reasonable cost. 
So I'm asking $50 for the kits and $70 for the one completed controller. + $7 shipping to the US.
The link above includes 3 pictures showing the kit contents, which are all individually labeled, as well as a populated board and a completed controller.
I have a shear & brake here and a bunch of scrap aluminum so I banged up some small boxes that I've included free, but you will have to spend a few minutes tweaking them yourselves to make them pretty, or you could buy a real nice extruded aluminum case that is sure to make you faster.
Not included is the mating D-sub connector and backshell as well as the panel mounted indicating LED and of coarse the switch, which you should already have with your prop. I already had these items for myself so I would've had to order these items for the extra kits and since some builders prefer crimped pins while some prefer soldered and there is a multitude of LED options to suit your panel, and I'm not getting into any sort of business here, I decided to just leave this to the individual.
As this project is the product of this list, I'm offering up these kits here first, before I offer them elsewhere. I have no intentions on making anymore of these so when they are gone, the only way to get another is to use the files in the linked folder to build your own.
Thanks,Todd Bartrim
C-FSTB
RV9 with tundra tires
13B turbo rotary


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 6:03 am    Post subject: IVOprop current limiter project Reply with quote

On 10/30/2018 3:10 AM, Todd Bartrim wrote:

Quote:
I've successfully completed this IVOprop current limiter project that designed by the collaborative effort of this group. After a bit of tweaking of the code by Paul Fisher and switching the position of the 2 zener diodes, it works perfectly.
For those that are unaware of what this project is;
The IVOprop as supplied uses a 10 amp circuit breaker to indicate end-of-travel. Now the IVO is a love-it or hate-it prop but even those that are in the love-it category will admit that waiting for a breaker to trip is not a very elegant way to know when the prop has reached it's end of travel. So over several years a project evolved on this list originally being completely hardware based and then evolving into this current micro controller based project. The original design was built by at least 2 individuals but it appeared that despite the work put in by members of this list, the micro controller based version had not been built. I had read with interest while the discussions were ongoing, but due to other commitments at the time, my project was on hold so I did not contribute. As I've recently returned to flight I decided I wanted to pursue this idea so I searched the archives and downloaded the material that Bob had hosted on his site in my efforts to revive this project.


    But what does it do, you might be asking??? Well it limits the current to 9.5 amps to the propeller pitch drive motor. When the prop blades reach their end of travel and come up against the soft stops, the current begins to sharply rise and when the controller senses that it reaches between 9.1 and 9.5 amps it will cut power to the drive and illuminate an LED on the panel to indicate that it has reached end of travel. The prop can be reversed immediately if required without having to reset the circuit breaker. The function is the same in both directions of travel. It is a far better solution.
  As always Electric Bob, deserves the lions share of credit for this, Paul Fisher wrote the code, but there were many others that contributed to it as well. Forgive but it's late as I type and I don't have time to search through the archives again to find all of the names of those that contributed to this effort. But I thank you, as I stood on your shoulders to finish this.

I've put the marked-up schematic and BOM as well as the hex code and all other pertinent files in a Google Drive folder at 
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1DeszjALTF6-L8dvuiy9jV7BY5q4t3G68?usp=sharing

In this file there is everything needed to duplicate this project including the gerber files for having the PCB boards manufactured at far less cost than by ExpressPCB. These files were provided by ExpressPCB who made the boards for me, so they should be accurate.
   However rather than go through all that trouble, you can buy one of the spare kits that I've put together at cost. I had 6 boards, so I ordered the components for all of them. I built two of them so that I could do the testing on at least 2 to ensure it was going to work. Obviously, I've kept one for myself and I've already sold one of the kits.
So I still have 3 kits for sale and one complete project. All of the PIC chips in each of the projects is programmed and as been tested in one of the complete projects on my plane, so there is no need to worry about learning to program these micro-controllers.
It ended up costing me about $400 all in for this project due to the cost of getting the prototype boards made and shipped to Canada along with my error in ordering an overpriced and obsolete PIC programmer, before ordering the correct one at a more reasonable cost. 


So I'm asking $50 for the kits and $70 for the one completed controller. + $7 shipping to the US.


The link above includes 3 pictures showing the kit contents, which are all individually labeled, as well as a populated board and a completed controller.
I have a shear & brake here and a bunch of scrap aluminum so I banged up some small boxes that I've included free, but you will have to spend a few minutes tweaking them yourselves to make them pretty, or you could buy a real nice extruded aluminum case that is sure to make you faster.
Not included is the mating D-sub connector and backshell as well as the panel mounted indicating LED and of coarse the switch, which you should already have with your prop. I already had these items for myself so I would've had to order these items for the extra kits and since some builders prefer crimped pins while some prefer soldered and there is a multitude of LED options to suit your panel, and I'm not getting into any sort of business here, I decided to just leave this to the individual.


As this project is the product of this list, I'm offering up these kits here first, before I offer them elsewhere. I have no intentions on making anymore of these so when they are gone, the only way to get another is to use the files in the linked folder to build your own.


Thanks, Todd Bartrim


C-FSTB
RV9 with tundra tires
13B turbo rotary








-----------I would like your built up controller, Please send address so I can send payment.    thank you Emil Radtke


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 7:32 am    Post subject: IVOprop current limiter project Reply with quote

Hi Emil and others;   Just so we don't clutter up the list with too much of this discussion unrelated to the development, I can be contacted directly at bartrim(at)gmail.com (bartrim(at)gmail.com)
The easiest way to pay me is through PayPal using bartrim(at)gmail.com (bartrim(at)gmail.com) as the recipient.
And of coarse I'll need your mailing address to ship it to you.
Total cost for the complete controller with shipping is $77. If you would like tracking with it, unfortunately the post office wants an extra $5 more.
While this was intended to be a DIY kit, I would be willing to assemble another kit if requested.
thanks,Todd Bartrim
On Tue, Oct 30, 2018 at 7:14 AM Emil Sr <papa11(at)centurylink.net (papa11(at)centurylink.net)> wrote:

Quote:
On 10/30/2018 3:10 AM, Todd Bartrim wrote:

Quote:
I've successfully completed this IVOprop current limiter project that designed by the collaborative effort of this group. After a bit of tweaking of the code by Paul Fisher and switching the position of the 2 zener diodes, it works perfectly.
For those that are unaware of what this project is;
The IVOprop as supplied uses a 10 amp circuit breaker to indicate end-of-travel. Now the IVO is a love-it or hate-it prop but even those that are in the love-it category will admit that waiting for a breaker to trip is not a very elegant way to know when the prop has reached it's end of travel. So over several years a project evolved on this list originally being completely hardware based and then evolving into this current micro controller based project. The original design was built by at least 2 individuals but it appeared that despite the work put in by members of this list, the micro controller based version had not been built. I had read with interest while the discussions were ongoing, but due to other commitments at the time, my project was on hold so I did not contribute. As I've recently returned to flight I decided I wanted to pursue this idea so I searched the archives and downloaded the material that Bob had hosted on his site in my efforts to revive this project.


    But what does it do, you might be asking??? Well it limits the current to 9.5 amps to the propeller pitch drive motor. When the prop blades reach their end of travel and come up against the soft stops, the current begins to sharply rise and when the controller senses that it reaches between 9.1 and 9.5 amps it will cut power to the drive and illuminate an LED on the panel to indicate that it has reached end of travel. The prop can be reversed immediately if required without having to reset the circuit breaker. The function is the same in both directions of travel. It is a far better solution.
  As always Electric Bob, deserves the lions share of credit for this, Paul Fisher wrote the code, but there were many others that contributed to it as well. Forgive but it's late as I type and I don't have time to search through the archives again to find all of the names of those that contributed to this effort. But I thank you, as I stood on your shoulders to finish this.

I've put the marked-up schematic and BOM as well as the hex code and all other pertinent files in a Google Drive folder at 
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1DeszjALTF6-L8dvuiy9jV7BY5q4t3G68?usp=sharing

In this file there is everything needed to duplicate this project including the gerber files for having the PCB boards manufactured at far less cost than by ExpressPCB. These files were provided by ExpressPCB who made the boards for me, so they should be accurate.
   However rather than go through all that trouble, you can buy one of the spare kits that I've put together at cost. I had 6 boards, so I ordered the components for all of them. I built two of them so that I could do the testing on at least 2 to ensure it was going to work. Obviously, I've kept one for myself and I've already sold one of the kits.
So I still have 3 kits for sale and one complete project. All of the PIC chips in each of the projects is programmed and as been tested in one of the complete projects on my plane, so there is no need to worry about learning to program these micro-controllers.
It ended up costing me about $400 all in for this project due to the cost of getting the prototype boards made and shipped to Canada along with my error in ordering an overpriced and obsolete PIC programmer, before ordering the correct one at a more reasonable cost. 


So I'm asking $50 for the kits and $70 for the one completed controller. + $7 shipping to the US.


The link above includes 3 pictures showing the kit contents, which are all individually labeled, as well as a populated board and a completed controller.
I have a shear & brake here and a bunch of scrap aluminum so I banged up some small boxes that I've included free, but you will have to spend a few minutes tweaking them yourselves to make them pretty, or you could buy a real nice extruded aluminum case that is sure to make you faster.
Not included is the mating D-sub connector and backshell as well as the panel mounted indicating LED and of coarse the switch, which you should already have with your prop. I already had these items for myself so I would've had to order these items for the extra kits and since some builders prefer crimped pins while some prefer soldered and there is a multitude of LED options to suit your panel, and I'm not getting into any sort of business here, I decided to just leave this to the individual.


As this project is the product of this list, I'm offering up these kits here first, before I offer them elsewhere. I have no intentions on making anymore of these so when they are gone, the only way to get another is to use the files in the linked folder to build your own.


Thanks, Todd Bartrim


C-FSTB
RV9 with tundra tires
13B turbo rotary








-----------I would like your built up controller, Please send address so I can send payment.    thank you Emil Radtke



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user9253



Joined: 28 Mar 2008
Posts: 1311
Location: Riley TWP Michigan

PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 10:11 am    Post subject: Re: IVOprop current limiter project Reply with quote

Good job Bob Nuckolls and Todd Bartrim and Paul Fisher.
_
Todd,
I have downloaded the files. One of them, "IVO Prop Current Limiter" does not have a file extension.
I was able to open it with MS Word and read what I assume is "C" code. (I am not a programmer)
Is Word the best program to use? If not what is the preferred program for opening that file?
Also, the gerber files seem to be missing.
A note on one of the pictures says to mount Q11 with the heat conducting side down.
Does "down" mean that the heat conductive surface is NOT touching the board? If so, then I
assume that a separate heat sink in necessary. Or is the aluminum case used as a heat sink?
I am happy with PCB boards that I have ordered in the past from Elecrow in China.
https://www.elecrow.com/pcb-manufacturing.html


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 11:13 am    Post subject: IVOprop current limiter project Reply with quote

Hi Joe;   The file you refer to is indeed the C code that was written by Paul Fisher. You can read it by opening it with any text editor such as notepad, word and, gedit, etc. Or if you want to try compiling it yourself you can use MPLAB X IDE, from microchip.com (its free), bit you don't need to as Paul has already compiled it into a hex code for us. That is the code that needs to be programmed to the PIC12F683 microcontroller chip using MPLAB X IPE (also free) and a PIC3 programmer (not free).
   The Q11 mosfet is indeed mounted on the bottom side of the board with the heat conducting surface facing away from the board so that it conducts heat away into the aluminum case. Included in the BOM is a heat conduction pad that is sandwiched between the mosfet and the case. I used a #4 screw through the board, Q11, pad and the case. This is probably overkill, as I find there to be no detectable heat on the outside of the case when in operation. I think you would have to be constantly adjusting the prop pitch to see any heat build-up.
Is there not a sub-folder showing called "PCB board Gerber files"?
It is showing for me. If you can't see it then maybe it didn't get the same sharing permission as the root folder did? 
In that files are the Gerber files exactly as supplied by ExpressPCB, along with the original .PCB file.
  I had looked at elecrow ro build the boards bit I'm not familiar with Gerber files enough to ensure I could correctly convert the .PCB file. I didn't get these files until after I paid ExpressPCB for the batch of boards.  
  I think the reason they supply them with each order is that they recognize that their service is uneconomical to use for production beyond prototypes.
Todd

On Tue, Oct 30, 2018, 11:18 user9253, <fransew(at)gmail.com (fransew(at)gmail.com)> wrote:

Quote:
--> AeroElectric-List message posted by: "user9253" <fransew(at)gmail.com (fransew(at)gmail.com)>

Good job Bob Nuckolls and Todd Bartrim and Paul Fisher.
_
Todd,
I have downloaded the files.  One of them, "IVO Prop Current Limiter" does not have a file extension.
  I was able to open it with MS Word and read what I assume is "C" code.  (I am not a programmer)
 Is Word the best program to use?  If not what is the preferred program for opening that file?
  Also, the gerber files seem to be missing.
A note on one of the pictures says to mount Q11 with the heat conducting side down. 
Does "down" mean that the heat conductive surface is NOT touching the board?  If so, then I
assume that a separate heat sink in necessary.  Or is the aluminum case used as a heat sink?
 I am happy with PCB boards that I have ordered in the past from Elecrow in China.
https://www.elecrow.com/pcb-manufacturing.html

--------
Joe Gores




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Joined: 28 Mar 2008
Posts: 1311
Location: Riley TWP Michigan

PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 11:49 am    Post subject: Re: IVOprop current limiter project Reply with quote

Todd,
Thanks for the explanation. You are right about the Gerber files. The other 7 files have pictures. I missed the Gerber file folder because I was looking for a picture. My bad. I have now downloaded the Gerber files.
I use "Eagle" for making schematics and boards and generating Gerber files. Unfortunately it is not intuitive or user friendly unless used frequently. If I do not use the program for a long time, I have to relearn it. There have been threads in the past on this forum discussing other easier to use software.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2018 7:11 am    Post subject: IVOprop current limiter project Reply with quote

At 01:11 PM 10/30/2018, you wrote:
Quote:
--> AeroElectric-List message posted by: "user9253" <fransew(at)gmail.com>

Good job Bob Nuckolls and Todd Bartrim and Paul Fisher.

Thank you. This is a good example of what has
been described as 'spontaneous organization',
'the invisible hand', 'division of labor', and
countless other phrases for centuries.

Simply put, individuals with time, talents
and resources to move a particular activity
forward steps up to the task and gets 'er
done. The whole is at-risk until
all the bits an pieces are in place irrespective
of size and difficulty. Every contribution is
of paramount importance.

I am pleased to have been a participant in
this enhancement to the state of science
and art of our craft.

I'll get the drawings updated. I'd be
pleased to post the data package in the
DIY archives on aeroelectric.com




Bob . . .


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2018 7:23 am    Post subject: IVOprop current limiter project Reply with quote

At 02:49 PM 10/30/2018, you wrote:
Quote:
--> AeroElectric-List message posted by: "user9253" <fransew(at)gmail.com>

Todd,
Thanks for the explanation. You are right about the Gerber files. The other 7 files have pictures. I missed the Gerber file folder because I was looking for a picture. My bad. I have now downloaded the Gerber files.
I use "Eagle" for making schematics and boards and generating Gerber files. Unfortunately it is not intuitive or user friendly unless used frequently. If I do not use the program for a long time, I have to relearn it. There have been threads in the past on this forum discussing other easier to use software.


There are several offerings out there. My particular
fav is ExpressPCB whiche does have a schematic capture
and bill of materials utility. Having 'cut my teeth'
on the schematic styles of the now century
old ARRL/QST publications, I've never warmed up to
the schematic/net-list features of ExpressPCB.
My artwork layout skills have roots in punched
out donuts and rolls of black, red or blue tape
on 1/10th grid mylar. So I was pleased that
ExpressPCB was particularly friendly to a layout
artist suffering from what might be considered arcane
habits.

ExpressPCB has excellent prototyping services
with 3-5 day turnaround . . . saved my arse
numerous times over the past 20 years. You
DO have to order one set of prototypes before
you can pay an extra fee for Gerber files.

No big deal since you probably want to stuff
at least one proof of concept board before
you order up a batch of production.

Further, like the AutoCAD symbols library I've
posted to aeroelectric.com, I have a library
of custom ExpressPCB components I can put up
on the server for anyone who's interested.


Bob . . .


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